Vitlycke

animalarium - alexandra wingate / lena kimming / olive schellander

Informal showing

Artistic leaders, performers and producers:
Lena Kimming, dancer and choreographer
Alexandra Wingate, performer and choreographer
Olive Schellander, dancer and choreographer
Josefina Björk, interactive video and performance artist

The project is interdisciplinary, based in Sweden, and the group has competence in choreography, performance, videoart, installation, sound and light design, photography, moving image, grafic design, interactive performance, interactive web, web communication, IT, programming and technology.

Development of the (web) work and reference persons for feedback:
Eric Sjögren, light and sound design, and technical producer, Thomas Wingate, projectleader and concept developer for softwear and web platforms. Ola Janson, web strategist and game designer. Carl Javér, Anna Björemark and Astrid Askberger filmmakers. Karin Lindroth, communicator, graphic designer and conceptual artist. Louise Waite communicator and performance artist

20.02

In Animalarium we are interested in how live is shaped online and how objectifying processes sadly seems to be an unavoidable follower to these forms. Our aim is to find methods to make art that in its content, form and placement can show the problematic aspects of how material is published, spread and consumed online. (Performance) art that can infiltrate sites with work that questions materials on the particular site. And in this way place the art at the same place where the situation we want to question exists.

We who gaze in parasitic rapture
Hannah Giorgis, feminist writer in The Guardian and more, writes on how we participate in creating and upholding negative structures in society through how material is published, spread and consumed online. An example she mentions is the publication and reaction to a film (at TMZ.com) where a famous male NFL player brutally assaults his then girlfriend. She writes ”we feel entitled (and excited) to access gut-wrenching images of a woman being abused – to be entranced by the looks of domestic violence – speaks volumes not only about the man who battered her, but also about we who gaze in parasitic rapture. We click and consume, comment and carry on.”
Giorgis puts words on the emphatical blunting that exists online between consumer and the lead(s) of the material. An emphatical blunting that can lead to objectifying, dehumanising, and violence romanticizing behaviour.